How much do spiritual coaches make? – Six Figure Coaching Business

Teaching and coaching in spiritual disciplines are often extremely challenging. So what does a religious teacher make? In a study released last month by the National Academy of Religion, the average salary for a religious teacher was $75,000 or more. And the average salary of a religious leader ($78,000), as defined by the American Center for Employee Reliability, is an impressive sum: Almost $115,000.

In some cases, teachers don’t even live on the income—the National Academy of Religion calculated how much a teacher made for each hour worked.

In addition, the religious leader is subject to different forms of financial accountability than the other employees. They have to pay taxes, if they are employed, as well as expenses, such as health insurance. They face scrutiny from the IRS, which has to review and approve the salary of their employees.

“Some churches have no employees, all the money is donated, and they don’t have to pay any taxes,” says Dr. David H. Lewis, a professor of religion at the University of Washington. “But some churches are very large, and they have to pay some taxes.”

The average salaries of secular clergy and religious leaders in the United States were not shown by the National Academy of Religion study. There have been studies which suggest that religious leaders make more than secular clergy, but many studies do not provide a complete picture.
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In an article in Religion News Service, sociologist Joseph R. Morris, one of the people who conducted the salary study, explained why he chose the salary figures he did.

“Religious leaders, like other employees, take on additional responsibilities during their time at religious service,” Morris wrote. “It can be difficult to pay for all the things a religious leader needs to do while still providing sufficient income.”

A former top aide of Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham ClintonSenate panel subpoenas Roger Stone associate for Russia probe Webb: The new mob: Anti-American Dems Clinton to hold fundraiser for Menendez in NJ next month MORE criticized the Clinton Foundation this week for allowing her husband’s foundation to accept donations from foreign governments and individuals in 2011 without disclosing those dealings.

“This is a new low in the relationship between the State Department and the Clinton Foundation,” said Cheryl Mills, the former top Clinton aide whom the foundation removed from its board of trustees last summer amid allegations about an unusual political contribution and other ethics issues.

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“The State Department in the summer of 2011, at the

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How much do spiritual coaches make? – Six Figure Coaching Business
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